Clinical Trials: General Information

Clinical Trials: General Information

Clinical trials allow scientists and doctors to test new ways to treat illnesses. They are also an option for people to try something new at less cost. The following links may help you decide if you want to be in a clinical trial.
CenterWatch Clinical Trials Listing Service
(Thomson CenterWatch)
"You can use this site to find a wealth of information about clinical research, including listings of more than 41,000 active industry and government-sponsored clinical trials, as well as new drug therapies in research and those recently approved by the FDA. " In addition to listings of clinical trials, there is a glossary of clinical research terms and a number of drug directories, including Drugs Newly Approved by the FDA and PDR Family Guides Drug Information.
http://www.centerwatch.com/
Children and Clinical Studies
(National Heart Lung and Blood Institute)
Children’s bodies do not react the same as adults to certain medical treatments. This Website explains why this is and why research into children’s medical care is important. It answers questions about enrolling a child in a clinical trial: the pros and cons, how studies are structured, precautions parents should take, and the rights of children and parents involved in a clinical study. Included are videos of professionals, parents, and children discussing these issues.
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/childrenandclinicalstudies/index.php
Clinical trials
(National Cancer Institute)
On the National Cancer Institute's site, you can learn what clinical trials are and how they are used to help patients and to find better treatments for cancer. If you want to consider being in a clinical trial, this is a good site to visit with your doctor or health care professional to find out if trials are available. Select Finding Clinical Trials for links to information about particular trials.
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials
Clinical Trials
(National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
The National Institute of Health answers questions about clinical trials. A list of dental and craniofacial (referring to the head and face) studies seeking patients for clinical trials is included. There is also information for professionals and patient advocates who want to increase awareness of clinical trials.
http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/clinicaltrials/
Clinical Trials
(MEDLINEplus)
Links to sites which have been reviewed by librarians at the National Library of Medicine.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/clinicaltrials.html
Clinical Trials.gov
(National Institues of Health)
This site allows individuals to search for clinical studies sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and other Federal and non-Federal organizations. It contains over 5,000 clinical trials. For a basic understanding of clinical trials, look under Resource Information in the center of the page, then select Understanding Clinical Trials.
http://clinicaltrials.gov/
Participating in Clinical Trials
(NIH Senior Health)
Learn basic information about clinical trials, written in plain language. Chapters include What is a Clinical Trial, Finding a Clinical Trial, Informed Consent and Should I Join a Clinical Trial. Includes a short video. As part of the NIHSeniorHealth Website, this site offers options for enlarging the size of the text and having the words read to you as you move through the site.
http://nihseniorhealth.gov/participatinginclinicaltrials/toc.html
ResearchMatch
(National Center for Research Resources)
A free and secure registry for people who want to participate in research studies. ResearchMatch was developed by major academic institutions across the country. It can help ‘match’ you with any type of research study, ranging from surveys to clinical trials, always giving you the choice to decide what studies may interest you. The Medical University of South Carolina is part of the ResearchMatch network.
https://www.researchmatch.org/
Selected NHLBI Clinical Trials Across the U.S.
(National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute)
Clinical trials sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health can be found at this site. You can search for trials by disease or condition, age group, and stage of trial. If you want to consider being in a clinical trial, this is a good site to visit with your doctor or health care professional to find out if trials are available.
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/studies/index.htm
Taking Part in Research Studies: What Questions Should You Ask?
(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
This is a complete, easy-to-read list of questions to ask about being in a clinical trial or study. Take this with you to talk to your doctor or health provider. Also available in Spanish.
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/brochures/unC3bro.htm
Learn About Clinical Studies
(National Library of Medicine)
Explains clinical trials in a question and answer format. Presents lots of information that patients and their families will want to know if they are thinking about enrolling in a clinical trial. A list of questions to ask your doctor or the people doing the study is very helpful.
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-studies/learn

Last Modified: Tuesday November 17, 2009 10:00 AM